Bio Building

Legambiente rewards the smog-eating tile


We have already talked about IdeeGreen of the tile eats smog, an innovative and effective system of breaking down some of the main pollutants in the air, especially nitrogen oxides, and making the air around the house healthier. A tile that, in practice, in addition to protecting from rain and snow (which remains its main function) acts as a continuous cycle air purifier.

The news today is that too Legambiente recognized the validity of the tile eats smog, including this element in the list of innovative materials for eco-building in its latest report 'Innovation and sustainability in the construction sector'. The quote from the prestigious Italian environmental association is in particular for the product AURANOX of the company Wierer which exploits the photocatalytic properties of titanium dioxide.

How is a smog-eating tile made? AURANOX is one mineral tile consisting of a cement mixture composed of natural sand, cement, water and iron oxides for coloring. The use of inert materials makes it a 100% recyclable product. The addition of titanium dioxide in the surface micro-concrete allows to obtain an anti-smog effect, without altering the mechanical and functional characteristics of the tile and its properties.

Why titanium dioxide? Because this element is a catalyst that, subjected to light radiation, acts by accelerating the oxidation reaction of pollutants, transforming them into inorganic salts that are harmless to the environment. The salts, thanks to the action of rainwater, are then washed away from the roof and dissolved in the ground. Titanium dioxide increases the speed of the chemical reaction without altering or reducing.

And the problem of disposal? At the end of their life cycle, mineral tiles such as AURANOX are pulverized and used as road foundations or foundation works. In addition, the washing water from the plants is recovered and reused in the concrete mix.


Video: PTI Smog Eating Roads! Reducing air pollution with photocatalytic pavements. (October 2020).